Season’s Greetings

Georg Fischer Piping Systems would like to wish you a safe and enjoyable Christmas, and New Year. We look forward to a busy 2011 for all. Please note that our blog will be not be monitored during the festive season from midday, Friday 24 December 2010, until 7 January 2011. Our offices throughout Australia will be closed from midday, Friday 24 December 2010, and will reopen for business on Tuesday January 4, 2011. If you have any urgent inquiries during this time, please contact Bruce Dyne on 0414 485...

Piping, Safety and the Environment

Environmental protection and operational safety are increasingly more important in the piping industry. This is particularly true for the conveyance of liquid and gaseous media which can be hazardous to people and surroundings. Piping systems made from thermoplastics are increasingly replacing conventional pipe materials such as steel, cast iron, concrete, stoneware, ceramic and even FRP because they are environmentally friendly, safe and easy to use. Due to their good chemical and mechanical resistance, plastic pipes are ideal for safely moving dangerous liquids and gases. Tough and robust, they are also hard wearing and deliver an exceptionally long life when compared to other types of pipes. For added safety and environmental protection, plastic pipes can be used in a double-containment system. This consists of an outer protective pipe into which the medium-conveying inner pipe is integrated. Any leaks can be contained in the outer protective pipe in the annular space until the damage can be located and rectified. Georg Fischer offers a number of double containment options: Contain It: A clear PVC system for new and existing applications, with solid or split pipe and fittings available in 4” and 6”. Contain-It Plus: A complete double-containment system for new applications, with PE100 outer pipe (to d315). Inner pipe is available in UPVC, PP, PE100 or PVDF (to d225), and CPVC (to d110). Schedule 80 UPVC and CPVC pipe sizes are also available for carrier pipe. Fuseal Squared: An acid waste drainage system (suitable for above ground and buried applications) available in PP and PVDF. The size range for pipe and fittings includes 11/2” x 4” through to 8” x 12”. Fuseal Squared...

Electrofusion Jointing in 14 Easy Steps

PE pipe joints can fail in the field if they are not welded together correctly. The joints can leak or worse, completely fail and disconnect if the electrofusion jointing process is not performed properly. Yet, the process itself is quite simple really. Following are the steps required to achieve a successful joint: 1. Clean pipe, cut at right angles and deburr edges. 2. Remove oxidised layer of pipe with rotary scraper (note maximum allowable wall thickness reduction). 3. Clean pipe with cleaning cloth and Tangit PE cleaner in peeled area only. 4. Mark the insertion depth on the pipe. 5. Remove fitting from the packaging without touching the fusion surface. 6. Push in the PE pipe up to centre stop or marking. 7. Firmly tighten the integrated clamping screws alternately, until it is no longer possible to rotate or move the fitting on the pipe. 8. Push in second PE pipe up to centre stop or marking. 9. Firmly tighten the integrated clamping screws alternately, until it is no longer possible to rotate or move the fitting on the pipe. 10. The components to be jointed must remain stress-free. 11. Complete fusion procedure in accordance with the operating instructions for the control unit. 12. After fusion, check indicators on fitting and the display in fusion control unit, then remove cables. 13. Ensure jointing area remains stress-free until cooling period has elapsed. 14. Wait at least for the minimum cooling time and then conduct pressure...