What Happens to the Pressure rating when your PE Fittings are Workshop Fabricated?

It is important to be aware that reductions occur to the pressure rating of PE100 fittings fabricated from PE100 pipe.      A de-rating of the maximum allowable operating pressure applies once a workshop fabricated fitting is joined to the pipeline, and different PE fittings geometries require differing de-rating factors.   The information supplied in this blog relates to fabricated PE fittings, manufactured using AS/NZS 4130 PE pipe. Unless performance and test data is provided to support alternative values, the following weld factors and de-rating factors should be used: Equal Tees   0.6 Reducing Tees ( dia. branch < 0.33 * dia. Basic pipe )    0.8   ( dia. Branch > 0.33 * dia. Basic pipe )    0.6 Bends : Any angle above Radius 1*Diameter     1.0 Fabricated Sweep bends (No reduction in wall) 2*diameter         0.9                                                < 2*diameter      0.8 (Wall on inner radius to be +10% of min. pipe wall to AS/NZS 4130, Outer radius wall to be within –5% of min. pipe wall to AS/NZS 4130) Segmented bends radius 1*diameter to 1.5* diameter      0.7 The above de-ratings were prepared by The PIPA Technical Committee as a guide to the de-rating of Polyethylene fabricated and moulded sweep bends and Tees, for use with polyethylene pipe made to AS/NZS 4130. For the manufacturing factors the following de-rating factors apply: Moulded    1.0 Butt Welded     0.9 Socket/Mirror Welded     0.8 Extrusion Welded     0.6 Saddle Fusion     1.0 For the above factors no other welding method is acceptable. The de-ratings are taken from the German Plastics Welding Institute recommendations, and are considered to be conservative. However it is considered necessary to use this conservative rating on these items, as the consequential costs involved with a failure of...

Why use Polybutylene in hot and cold potable water systems?

Polybutylene (PB) was discovered in 1954 by the research team of Prof. Giulio Natta, the 1963 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry. The first industrial production and the introduction into flexible pressure piping systems started in Europe in the mid 1960’s. The development of new applications and markets occurred during the 1970’s and 1980’s. Continuous research and development has resulted in the sophisticated design of pipe system components and improved manufacturing technology with optimised material characteristics. PB  piping systems developed and specified by engineering firms and pipe producers have demonstrated their exceptional performance in a variety of demanding long-term applications and have found broad acceptance amongst engineers, architects, planners, building contractors, installers and homeowners. In the past, plastic pipe materials have had an unjustified image problem, often being considered to be commodity products such as plastic packaging or other single use consumer applications. This perception is changing and PB in particular is being recognised as a high-tech engineering material. Pipe systems made from PB have become a vital part of modern building technology. They lead the way to sustainable buildings, offering a best in class ecology profile, facilitating and promoting energy efficient constructions. In this respect, PB pipe systems outperform alternative systems made from traditional plumbing and heating materials, without making any concessions on quality. Some of the advantages of using PB Freedom from scale build-up and encrustation in hard water supply areas is guaranteed. Smooth internal pipe surfaces combined with inert chemical properties leads to the complete elimination of calcium carbonate deposition, thus ensuring long-term efficiency in water heating and circulation. Resistance to freezing temperatures – the flexibility and...