Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year

Georg Fischer Piping Systems would like to wish you a safe and enjoyable Christmas, and New Year. We look forward to a busy 2013 for all. Please note that our blog will be not be monitored during the festive season from COB Friday 21 December 2012, until Monday January 7, 2013. Additionally please also note our offices throughout Australia will be closed at COB Friday December 21, 2012, and will reopen on Wednesday January 2, 2013. If you have any urgent enquiries during this time, please contact Bruce Dyne on 0414 485...

Using plastic piping systems means saving energy

Plastics constitute only a small percentage of the entire crude oil usage. But crude oil resources are limited. Already today we have to fall back upon raw materials which can be recycled and extend alternative energy sources. In this context we talk about re-usable raw materials. All working processes need energy (heat, pressure, motor power). In comparison with metals, manufacturing plastics requires less...

Ecological balance for plastic piping systems

Currently PVC, besides polyethylene, is the most important material of consideration which, because of its versatility, is not achieved by any other raw material. Piping components of PVC have attained such great significance that not using them in many applications is no longer imaginable. During PVC manufacture, pool concentrations of all dangerous intermediate products are abided by or only handled in closed systems, allowing the exclusion of risks to employees. During PVC processing, all effective industrial safety regulations are clearly improved upon and, with lowered energy requirements, the impact on the environment is additionally reduced. Owing to their chemical stability, PVC products are completely non-toxic in normal use, are suitable for use with food, and are used in applications involving blood conservation and dialysis.. It is frequently claimed that during fires additional hazards from PVC exist for those in the immediate area. Intensive fire testing has been carried out with PVC. Building fires can also set fire to the difficult-to-ignite and self-extinguishing PVC. PVC, however, does not contribute to the spread of the fire. In cases of fire, the fumes are always toxic, regardless of the type of material burning. The greatest danger in a fire arises from the production of highly poisonous carbon monoxide gas. From an insurance viewpoint, PVC is handled in the same manner as other customary construction materials. Dioxins/furans have been shown to be produced in all combustion processes. PVC components have even been shown to play a subordinate role. If all the points of the above ecological balance are taken into account, then the conclusion can be that currently there are no acceptable substitutions...