Safety First with Showers & Eye Wash Stations

A chemical exposure accident may cause injuries to eyes, face and other parts of a human body. The emergency shower is a necessary first aid response to minimise the effects of a chemical exposure accident.  The initial 10 to 15 seconds after exposure to a hazardous substance, particularly a corrosive one, are crucial.  Delaying treatment, even for a few seconds, may cause severe injury. Even more critical is the delivery temperature of the water and wait the time taken for water to flow from a cool source to the safety shower which on a long run may be considerable. Imagine an exposed steel pipe in the Australian summer heating up in the midday sun. The affected person would not only receive burns from the chemical exposure but potentially from the hot water in the supply pipeline as well. In accordance with the AS 4775 -2007 Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment, flushing fluid shall be tepid, in which the optimum temperature range is between 15.6oC and 37.8oC.  Tepid-water systems can become a source of Legionella; therefore, the emergency shower shall be operated weekly by the user to make sure it works and also to clean the line of microbial hazards (flushing of stagnate water from plumbed fixtures).  For each test, a signed and dated record should be kept with the facility and maintained by the user. The affected body part should be flushed for a minimum of 15 minutes using a large and clean supply of flushing fluid under low pressure. A preinsulated pipe line and fittings can prevent the water at the safety shower and eye wash stations from...